work together - Jessica Abel
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Answer these 10 quick questions to uncover the real reasons why you’re not able to take control of your creative work.

work together

 

leave the dark forest with Jessica AbelFind your Creative Partner

You’re devoted to making creative work. You build your identity around it, both personally and professionally. Which is why, when you grind to a halt, when you lose control of your ability to get the work done, when you just don’t know which path to take narratively or creatively, it’s so very painful. “I’ll never get this piece finished. I have no idea what to do next. I just can’t do this.” That feeling, the deep in the Dark Forest feeling…it’s soul-destroying. There are few things other than threats to the safety and health of our loved ones that scare us more than that.

This feeling comes over you because you’re doing what you should be doing as a creative person: you’re reaching for the stars, you’re building something big. And because it’s big, it’s just really difficult to get your head all the way around it. Being in the Dark Forest is a good sign. It means that you’re going in the right direction: growing and doing work that will take you places you’ve never been.

If what you’re doing is deep, if it’s worth doing, it’s going to be hard.

We all get lost in the Dark Forest. But it does not have to take you down. Getting stuck doesn’t mean you’re not cut out for this, or that you’ll never get out and make good work again. It means you’re trying to walk to Grandma’s house all alone, and you’ve gotten a bit lost.

With the right tools and structure, with the right feedback, you will get out of the Forest faster, and you’ll stay out longer. Best part: you don’t have to do it on your own.

Find your path

The secret to getting your work finished is…getting your butt in the chair and doing the work day after day. I know, you were hoping I’d say something more magical. What good is butt-in-chair if every time you open your project you find yourself falling down a Facebook rabbit hole?

Here’s the magic part: The answer is not wrestling your resistant psyche to the ground with brute strength. Sure, you can do that once or twice, but it’s not an approach that works long-term. Getting the work happening is about learning and implementing a set of tools and strategies that are built around who you are as a creative person, tools that work with you, and not against you.

And one of those key strategies? Have someone looking over your shoulder who cares that you get this right and get it done.

I learned the hard way that the idea that artists are required to work in isolation is a crock. Time and again, it wasn’t until I scheduled structured conversations with a fellow creative who understood the fundamentals of building a story that I found the right path and got out of the woods.

I am here to tell you: It’s not cheating to share your work with someone else. In fact, I’ve come to understand that it’s essential to do so if you’re to achieve the distance you need from your own thought process.

Because wherever you’ve got to with your project, one thing is certain: you’re too close.

The fastest way to get back on track with your project and find the story that’s waiting to be told is to work it through with someone who can see what you’ve written and understand what you really mean—what the story wants to be.

There are two things you need to do to make your best work: you need systems that support you, that clear space for work to happen and inspiration to hit, and you need perspective on your work itself, the content, to work your way through knotty problems.

  • Imagine feeling the elements of your story clicking into place, clear, in the right order, just as they will for your readers.
  • Picture knowing that you’re on track – that your story has everything it needs to keep your audience on the roller coaster, gripped right to the end.
  • Think how it would feel to be confident that you have the talent and the tools you need to actually finish the project; knowing that you’re spending your time and energy in the right places to get you through to the end.
  • You can have this: you’ll snap your laptop shut, and find yourself unable to resist saying BOOM! out loud, to no one in particular, because you know you nailed it.

Together we’ll draw the map

I’m not medium-agnostic. I’m a cartoonist, and proud of it. My native form of narrative, comics, combines visual narrative and prose. I’ve written three prose books and been an illustrator. Between that and the huge amount of time I’ve spent studying narrative audio, I’m more comfortable thinking of how all these forms of narrative are similar (and how they can be mixed and aligned) than how they’re different.

So yes, I’m a writer – I like words and crafting sentences as much as you do.

But what I’m really interested in is how things fit together. I’m a puzzle master; what I’m great at is looking at the deep structure of your project and identifying the missing part of your story; the one piece that fits perfectly and makes everything come together.

I know which questions to ask. I love strategic planning. Narrowing down, focusing in on what the important choices are and when they need to take place. I love to talk through complicated problems and find step-by-step solutions. To make plans, create systems, and get things in the proper order.

Yes, being an artist is about doing the work. You knew that already.

But the idea that you need to do it all on your own? That’s just wrong (and, frankly, scary).

I’ve learned, practiced, and taught the fundamentals of compelling narrative for decades. I can give your work the one-on-one attention it needs to get you back into flow. I can be your story Sherpa. Having a guide means you can focus your energy on finding firm footholds – without worrying about taking a wrong turn, walking off a cliff, or being eaten by a (metaphorical) yeti.

But all the insight in the world into your work will do you no good if you still aren’t actually creating it: I’ve built and used a set of creative productivity tools that have allowed me to publish eight books and produce a podcast in the last ten years, on top of being a professor, an editor, and a parent. We’ll put these tools to work in your creative life, and take procrastination and anxiety out of the picture.

Editorial insight

Together we’ll come up with a map to get you from where you are to where you want to be:

  • A concrete analysis of what your story is doing: What works, what doesn’t.
  • A clear path out of the woods: What to change, what to fix, what to focus on. What your choices are for the different aspects of your story, and more importantly, what the implications of each choice are.
  • How to prepare for the next stage of a story before you get there. (In a narrative context: laying the groundwork/planting seeds for later developments)
  • How to deal with when you get stuck. We all get stuck. It’s a part of the process. The question is: what will get you moving again? We’ll develop a system together, and you’ll learn to implement it independently.

Do The Work

As a practicing artist, I’ve tested and taught strategies for productivity that will give you the energy and the structure to work through even huge projects without getting overwhelmed.

  • Get your work started, and get your work done.
  • Set goals that have meaning, instead of driving you crazy.
  • Get out of a rut and back into a state of creative flow.
  • Be a narrative artist who actually works.

There are two ways to work with me.

Need just one session for feedback on a project?

Book a Focus Session.

A focus session is a combination of a brainstorm, a trouble-shoot, and an edit. You might bring me a raw story idea, a semi-developed pitch, or you might have done a draft and need to discuss it. You may also want to work on your process, and getting your system set up. A Focus Session is a one-shot. It lasts 50 minutes. We’ll do our best work together when we really focus, so I look at just one page of material per session.

$250

Email me at contact (at) jessicaabel.com to set up a time. If you’re in North America, calls will be scheduled between 7 am and 12 pm, or at 3 pm EST. (Europe: during business hours. Other locations: please inquire.)

Need more in-depth help?

Get your Creative Partner.

We will design a program around your needs. The components will be getting your creative system set up and functioning so that you’re regularly producing your work, and discussion, feedback, and guidance on your creative work in progress. Skype sessions will normally take place at intervals of about 2 weeks, and I will read up to 10 pages of material per session (or the audio equivalent).

3 sessions: $650

6 sessions: $1200

Email me at contact (at) jessicaabel.com to book a free Skype consultation, and find out how I can help you find your motivation, hone your story, and finish your project.

If you’re in North America, calls will be scheduled between 7 am and 12 pm, or at 3 pm EST. (Europe: during business hours. Other locations: please inquire.)

You don’t have to do it alone.

Answer these 10 quick questions
to uncover the real reasons why you’re not able
to take control of your creative work.