cordao-de-ouro

Cordão de Ouro

An excerpt from this strip appears in Mastering Comics, and someone (Ryan Mita) wrote the other day in capoeira solidarity…and, indeed, Matt and I did play capoeira for a few years in Mexico and right after we returned to the US in 2000.

Age, the unwieldy geography of NYC (living an hour+ away from the main places people practice) and inability fo find a group that even approaches the awesomeness of Capoeira Longe do Mar all contributed to our exit.

The fact that there’s a capoeira group in Angoulême, where we’ll be in a few short weeks, gives hope for a new start, despite being older than ever. Maybe for our kids, anyway.

This strip ran in Pulse! Magazine, the in-house magazine of Tower Records, where many many great cartoonists published throughout the 90s under the auspices of the amazing Marc Weidenbaum. It’s one of the few collaborative comics Matt and I have ever done.

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