Hey artist, how do you make it work?

I’m a cartoonist and a writer. I do this work because I have something I want to communicate. Communicating that (and continuing to produce it) requires selling it, and so selling it is part of the job. Shakespeare had to sell theater tickets. DaVinci had to sell paintings. Dickens had to sell magazines. Being in the business of selling my work does not suddenly make me a “business person.” It makes me an artist.

Lucy Bellwood and Jessica Abel in conversation about self-doubt demons, should monsters, social media, building an audience, and how to rock crowdfunding.

What happens when you let your demons run loose (spoiler: good things)

You should be making your creative work every day. You should be spending more time with your family and friends. You should spend a lot more time in selling your work. You shouldn’t have to sell anything: your work should speak for itself. You should be much further along in your career. You should give

Why you procrastinate, and how to stop, on JessicaAbel.com. "Wake up call."

Why you procrastinate, and how to stop

I know you’re serious about your creative work. Whether or not that work is your job, your self-generated projects are the key to your future self. Which is why it’s so crazy that when you sit down to face that work (if you even get that far), you squirm and procrastinate and end up on social

simple

The value of simple goals

Obviously, one can be overburdened with things that need doing, and that can make getting creative work done very difficult.
But it’s not actually freedom from all the things that makes the work possible.